Scott Brison’s departure is a loss for Canada’s public service

Fellow members,

Like many Canadians, I was sorry to learn yesterday that Treasury Board President and Minister of Digital Government Scott Brison is leaving Cabinet and will not be seeking re-election later this year.

I have the utmost respect for Scott and for his accomplishments during his tenure as one of Canada’s most senior ministers. He always brought thoughtfulness, a desire to work collaboratively and a sense of humour to our discussions. Some of his first words to me were: “We won't always agree, but we don't have to be disagreeable about it" - and he always lived up to that principle.

I remember how impressed I was when he agreed to speak at our 2016 Annual General Meeting after his appointment to Cabinet.  But he wasn’t just a skillful politician and public speaker. He was an accomplished administrator, and his arrival on the scene set a new tone of respect for public servants and for bargaining agents. As President of the Treasury Board, his work on Diversity and Inclusion, Pay Equity, Employee Wellness and a new streamlined collective bargaining Protocol (amongst other key issues) helped restore a more confident and effective public service. As Minister of Digital Government, he helped make federal services more accessible for all Canadians. Nobody ever doubted his competence or his commitment to the country.

Debi Daviau & Scott Brison

 

The Institute looks forward to enjoying a continued productive and collaborative relationship with the next Treasury Board President - especially with the round of bargaining currently underway and the work to replace Phoenix. 

On behalf of our 60,000 PIPSC members, I would like to wish Scott all the best in his future endeavours with Max and their beautiful twin girls. He will be missed.

Sincerely,

Debi Daviau,
President


16 January 2019
The federal government has just announced that it is proposing new measures to help correct the wide-ranging issue of employees having to repay the gross instead of the net amount of a salary overpayment caused by system, administrative or clerical errors. This is particularly significant for PIPSC members: tens of thousands of you have experienced this problem first-hand thanks to the calamitous Phoenix system.

15 January 2019
The New Year will see the Institute continue to be very active in defending the interests of its members, and I would like to take this opportunity to keep you informed of some of the key issues we will be facing over the next twelve months.

11 January 2019
Like many Canadians, I was sorry to learn yesterday that Treasury Board President and Minister of Digital Government Scott Brison is leaving Cabinet and will not be seeking re-election later this year.

4 December 2018
While PIPSC, alongside our union partners at the National Joint Council Dental Care Board of Management, is still negotiating hard to improve the majority of our members’ dental plan (NJC Component 55555), I am very pleased to announce that we have nailed down the following significant improvemen

30 November 2018
Earlier this year, in its 2018 Budget, the federal government announced its intention to replace the catastrophic Phoenix pay system with a new, functional alternative.

10 October 2018
On October 4, 2018 I made a presentation to the Government Operations Committee of the House of Commons about the current state of the federal public service hiring process. This was very timely, as the government had just released its own study of the issue.